I would like to speak for a few moments about depression and recovery from attempted suicide.

One might think that a person–saved from the brink of a suicide–may respond in gratitude; after all, their life was just saved! They should be all fine and dandy now after such a close call, right?

Unfortunately this does not apply to everyone. A person with depression may spend much time debating internally whether they should go ahead with the deed. This is rarely ever a decision that comes lightly. It goes against every cell, instinct and by-product of millions of years of evolution for someone to choose taking their own life. Most of the time, this is because they feel so much pain in their existence that ending their existence is the only escape they see.

In halting their attempt we foil a plan that has taken effort, time and no small degree of guts to carry out. If they were expecting an escape from such immense pain with a suicide, we just ruined it by saving their lives.

So it is perhaps not so surprising that some some react negatively, even angrily.

Please strive not to judge them. Give them space, time and most of all a shoulder to lean on if they need.

As Mr Stephen Fry once said:

“If you know someone who’s depressed, please resolve never to ask them why. Depression isn’t a straightforward response to a bad situation; depression just is, like the weather.

Try to understand the blackness, lethargy, hopelessness, and loneliness they’re going through. Be there for them when they come through the other side. It’s hard to be a friend to someone who’s depressed, but it is one of the kindest, noblest, and best things you will ever do.”